Talk to Frank resources-for-family

What Is Talk To Frank?

The campaign against drugs that has the longest duration in the entire UK is Talk to Frank. Though, has the campaign stopped anybody from using any drugs?

Ten years prior a police Swat group collided with a calm suburban kitchen and transformed the substance of medication education in the UK until the end of time. Grim warnings about how drugs could mess you up and genuine pleas to resist the pushers that were creeping around every playground were gone. In came the quirky funny side and a light-hearted attitude.


The first advert featured a boy calling the police snatch squad on his mother because she wanted to discuss drugs with him. The message, "Drugs are illegal. Talking about them isn't. So Talk to Frank", was brand new as well.


Frank Friendly Confidential Drug Advice

Frank, the new identity for the National Drugs Helpline, was coined by the advertising agency Mother. Young people were meant to feel Frank was a helpful elder brother they could trust and from whom they could seek advice on illegal drugs. The quests of Pablo, the dog that's used as a substance mule, to a tour around a brain warehouse have been put forward under the Frank name, making it a well-known trade name amongst the youth of the nation.


According to Justin Tindal, the creative director of Leo Burnett the ad agency, what is of more importance is the fact that no-one ever saw Frank physically, so it was difficult for mockers to pick on him or blame him for not treating the kids right. Surprisingly, the funny imitations of the Frank videos found on YouTube are quite polite. As there is nothing that remotely suggests Frank is a government project, the campaign is viewed as a first occurrence funded by the government.

Substance education has developed a lot since Nancy Reagan, and in the United Kingdom, Grange Hill cast encouraged teens to simply "Say No" to drugs, a campaign which several professionals now think had the opposite of the desire effect.


Most promotions in Europe now concentrate, similar to Frank, on attempting to give fair-minded data to help youngsters settle on their own choices. In some places where there are still tough penalties for possession, ads showing prison bars or disappointed parents are still the norm. A recent campaign launched in Singapore informed young people who visit clubs, "You play, you pay".

In the UK, the Above the Influence campaign has cost the federal government millions of dollars and uses humour and cautionary stories to encourage people to choose positive alternatives to drugs One ad shows a group of "stoners" sitting on a sofa and emphasizes talking to young people in the language of their generation. But the scare tactics is still prevalent in majority of the campaigns against drugs around the globe, especially the "descent into hell" which is drug inspired. One example is one of the DrugsNot4Me series in Canada that revealed how a very pretty confident woman slipped into deep-eyed wreck because of drugs.

Ads that reveal the dangers of drug abuse mostly push frustrated people into experimenting with drugs, according to a data from the anti-drugs campaign of the UK from 1999 to 2004.


Frank broke new ground and was abundantly critiqued by opposed Conservative politicians at the while for setting out to propose that drugs may offer highs in addition to lows.


Cocaine makes you feel on top of the world was one of its preliminary ads online.

It wasn't at all times simple to balance the message correctly. The person behind this cocaine ad has said that he now thinks he thought the average person browsing the web had a longer attention span. The negative effects were given at the end of the animated ad and some viewers might not have watched the whole thing. However, Powell claims the objective was to be more open with youngsters regarding substances, in an attempt to form the credibility of the Frank image.

According to the Home Office, 67% of younger people in a survey stated that they would ask Frank if they required advice on drugs. A total of 225,892 calls were made to the Frank helpline and a total of 3,341,777 visits to the site in 2011/12. These figures provide proof that the Frank approach bears results.

Though, like with any other anti-drug media campaign around the globe, there's no proof that Frank has stopped people to use substances.

Drug usage in the UK has gone around 9% in the decade since the conflict propelled, yet specialists say quite a bit of this is down to a decrease in cannabis utilization, potentially connected to changing states of mind towards smoking tobacco among youngsters.


What Is Frank?

FRANK is a national service that offers drug education and was formed in 2003 by the Department of Health in partnership with Home Office of the British government. It was designed to lower the rate of both legal and illegal drug use by providing education to teenagers and young people about what the effects of using drug and alcohol could be. Several media campaigns on the web and on radio have been put out by this programme.


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Services

FRANK provides the following services for people who seek information and/or advice about drugs

  • A dedicated website
  • A private phone number that is available round-the-clock
  • Email
  • A confidential live chat every day from 2 pm - 6 pm
  • A service to help find appropriate counselling or treatment